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ENow's 7 Best Blog Posts of 2018

 

As we start off 2019, we thought it would be a great time to reflect and look back at our most popular blog posts of 2018. HUGE shout-out to all our bloggers that made 2018 so great!  In no particular order, here are our stand-out posts of 2018. 

1.  What we can expect from Exchange Server 2019 - Thomas Stensitzki

On July 24, 2018, the Exchange Product Group released the preview version of Exchange Server 2019. This version is the third version of modern Exchange Server. Like the previous versions, Exchange Server 2019 benefits from the product developments tested and implemented in Exchange Online. But not all features available in Exchange Online are available in the on-premises version of Exchange Server. Additionally, not all features that are announced for the new release will be available when the RTM build is released. That is something that we have learned with previous releases of the product...

2. The Office 365 Domino Effect: Azure AD Outage  - Justin Harris & Jeff Guillet

What happens when cloud services we are so dependent on no longer work? Think about what a day of collaboration during meetings would look like for your end users if email, document storage, and team-based chat services were not available. For many in North America this exact scenario played out starting on Tuesday September 4th.

3. Managing Teams with PowerShell - Nathan O'Bryan

Do you know how to manage teams within PowerShell? This post covers a wide range of admin tasks for Microsoft Teams using PowerShell. Do yourself a favor and read this step-by-step guide, by the end you should be able to put together a decent Teams management script. 

4. Intelligently Using Migration Endpoints to Speed up Migration to Exchange Online - Michael Van Horenbeeck

In this three part series, Michael will cover Migration End Points. First, we will cover what Migration Endpoints are, what you use them for and how you can manually configure a migration endpoint. In the second part, we will dive deeper into how you can leverage multiple migration endpoints to potentially speed up your migration to Exchange Online. Lastly, we'll discuss some of the most common mistakes regarding Migration Endpoints and how to avoid or solve them.

 

5.  Migration of Legacy Public Folder to Modern Public Folder in Exchange Online - Thomas Stensitzki

Migrating public folders can be a daunting task... Exchange Server 2013 implemented a major change for public folder hierarchies and brought us modern public folders. In the previous versions of Exchange Server, public folders were replicated using their own replication technology.

Ps. ENow has some new reports that can help migrate your public folders.

6. Delegated Administration with Azure Active Directory Administrative Units - Dominik Hoeffling

Office 365 comes with a set of admin roles that can be assigned to users within your organization. Each admin role maps to common business functions and gives your users permissions to do specific tasks in the Office 365 admin center and Windows PowerShell. This is especially true for large organizations or universities with multiple brands or decentralized administration within a single Office 365 tenant, the default admin roles can cause headaches. While the delegation of permissions in Exchange Online works very well with Role Based Access Control (RBAC), other applications and services are hard to manage at a granular level

7. The Autodiscover Dilemma: Steps to Overcome IT - Jaap Wessalius

 Autodiscover was first introduced in Exchange 2007 and Outlook 2007 to quickly configure Outlook profiles, based on only the username and password. Outlook connects to the Exchange server, you enter your email address and password, and the Exchange server returns an XML package that Outlook uses to create or change its profile. The first implementation of Autodiscover was in Exchange 2007, but it is still used in Exchange 2019. Of course, there have been some improvements over the years, both in Exchange server as well as in Outlook, but overall the mechanism is the same.


We want to hear from you!

Our goal is to produce high quality content, written by industry-experts that provides value for our readers (like you!). If you have any topics you would like us to cover, please reach out to Nicole Silva at Nicole.Silva@enowsoftware.com