Azure & Active Directory Center

ENow Software's Azure & Active Directory blog built by Microsoft MVPs for IT/Sys Admins.

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Posts by

Matthew Levy

I am an IT pro with years of experience in the financial services industry. Currently, I work as a Solutions Architect for NBConsult. I have experience predominantly with Microsoft enterprise technologies, but like any sysadmin, I have a good understanding of multiple vendors and OEM technologies, not to mention cloud-based SAAS and particularly IT Admin services. Started my IT career in 1999, preparing thousands of IBM OS/2 machines for “Y2K” or the “Millennium Bug” by replacing them with Microsoft Window NT 4 Workstation. Today, I do Active Directory architectures, Exchange upgrades, migrations and hybrids, Intune device management and application management, PowerShell automation, SharePoint site administration, Microsoft Flows and PowerApps, even Azure DevOps and VS Code integration.

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Microsoft 365 Security Assessment Part 2

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Matthew Levy

Last week I shared part one of my Microsoft 365 Security Assessment where we took a deep dive into securing things related to Azure Active Directory. If you haven’t had a chance to read through it yet, take a few minutes and read it here.

Now that we’re all on the same page, lets dive into part two, where we’ll cover security settings in the Microsoft 365 Admin Center.

Moving on to the Microsoft 365 Admin Center

Turn ON modern authentication

Modern authentication is what allows you to enforce MFA and other identity based security features. Products that don’t use “modern authentication” use what we call “Legacy Authentication” (obviously) or “Basic Authentication”. It only uses username and password pairs to authenticate a user. The example shown in Figure 14: Basic authentication prompt is using legacy authentication, also known as basic authentication.
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