M365 - Exchange Online Center

ENow Software's Microsoft Exchange Online blog built by Microsoft MVPs for IT/Sys Admins.

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Michael Van Horenbeeck MVP, MCSM

Michael Van Horenbeeck is a Microsoft Certified Solutions Master (MCSM) and Exchange Server MVP from Belgium, with a strong focus on Microsoft Exchange, Office 365, Active Directory, and a bit of Lync. Michael has been active in the industry for about 12 years and developed a love for Exchange back in 2000. He is a frequent blogger and a member of the Belgian Unified Communications User Group Pro-Exchange. Besides writing about technology, Michael is a regular contributor to The UC Architects podcast and speaker at various conferences around the world. You can follow Michael via twitter (@mvanhorenbeeck) or his blog michaelvh.wordpress.com.

Office 365 Monitoring

Addressing the Office 365 Monitoring Gaps - Part 1

Image of Michael Van Horenbeeck MVP, MCSM
Michael Van Horenbeeck MVP, MCSM

Office 365 is a tremendous service that we all know and love. With Office 365, IT Pros and end users alike are equipped with a multitude of applications (Exchange Online, Teams, OneDrive, SharePoint, and more) that enable easier collaboration and increased productivity. Something as simple as collaborating on a word document in real time has changed the way people work.

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exchange online

An Overview of Office 365 Attack Simulator

Image of Michael Van Horenbeeck MVP, MCSM
Michael Van Horenbeeck MVP, MCSM

A few weeks back, Microsoft announced the Public Preview of a new and very interesting feature, named Attack Simulator. The idea behind Attack Simulator is to give you a safe toolset to use in order to probe some aspects of the security of your organization, when it comes to email hygiene and password strength, with more to come in the future. In this article, we will do a quick overview of Attack Simulator.

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Migration diagram

Part 2: Speed up Migrations to Exchange Online

Image of Michael Van Horenbeeck MVP, MCSM
Michael Van Horenbeeck MVP, MCSM

This is a multi-part article in which we will cover Migration Endpoints. First, we will cover what Migration Endpoints are, what you use them for and how you can manually configure a migration endpoint. In the second part of this article, we will dive deeper into how you can leverage multiple migration endpoints to potentially speed up your migration to Exchange Online. Lastly, we'll discuss some of the most common mistakes regarding Migration Endpoints and how to avoid or solve them.

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migration diagram

Part 1: Speed Up Migrations to Exchange Online

Image of Michael Van Horenbeeck MVP, MCSM
Michael Van Horenbeeck MVP, MCSM

This is a multi-part article in which we will cover Migration Endpoints. First, we will cover what Migration Endpoints are, what you use them for and how you can manually configure a migration endpoint. In the second part of this article, we will dive deeper into how you can leverage multiple migration endpoints to potentially speed up your migration to Exchange Online. Lastly, we'll discuss some of the most common mistakes regarding Migration Endpoints and how to avoid or solve them.

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Sizing Edge Transport Servers for a (Large) Hybrid Deployment

Image of Michael Van Horenbeeck MVP, MCSM
Michael Van Horenbeeck MVP, MCSM

When it comes to sizing a typical on-premises Exchange Server deployment, Microsoft has really gone out of their way to provide all the information you need. Along with the Mailbox Role Requirements Calculator, I believe Microsoft’s guidance to be one of the most complete in the industry—–leaving little to the imagination and with clear guidance on what you should and should not do.

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Hybrid listing image

Hybrid Headache: Hybrid mailbox moves and the “expect 100-continue” header

Image of Michael Van Horenbeeck MVP, MCSM
Michael Van Horenbeeck MVP, MCSM

 

A little over two years ago, I wrote about an issue I encountered with a KEMP load balancer and how Microsoft performs hybrid mailbox moves. More specifically, the issue evolved around a seemingly different interpretation between KEMP and Microsoft regarding the implementation of the expect 100-continue header. As I noted then, the workaround was to configure the KEMP load balancer to ignore the 100-Continue rules as described in RFC 2616.

A while ago, my good friend Bhargav Shukla reached out to me informing me that KEMP had tracked and solved the problem I described back then. As it turns out, Microsoft had based their interpretation of the expect 100-Continue header on RFC 7231 which superseded RFC 2616. I believe KEMP based itself on the latter, ultimately leading to the issue I described. This illustrates that it’s not always easy to keep up with the fast pace in the tech industry…

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love hate letter blocks

Hybrid Headache: Modern Public folders and Exchange Online

Image of Michael Van Horenbeeck MVP, MCSM
Michael Van Horenbeeck MVP, MCSM

Over the past few years, Microsoft has made many attempts to do away with public folders. If you have had the pleasure to work or are still working with Exchange 2007 and Exchange 2010, I’m sure you’ll remember the many rumors about Public Folders being deprecated in “vNext”. Yet, they still exist today in Exchange 2016 –although not in exactly the same form as in earlier versions of Exchange. Not only do they still exist, but Public Folders are still widely used! It’s not unheard of that a company has several million public folders representing terabytes worth of data.

Many administrators reacted surprised when Microsoft first announced “Modern Public Folders” back when Exchange 2013 was introduced to the world. Modern Public Folders offer the same exact user functionality as traditional public folders, but align with Microsoft’s efforts to improve high availability using Database Availability Groups. Traditional Public Folders, which were stored in separate Public Folder databases, did not fit into that paradigm. Even more so, because of that architecture with separate databases and no real HA story, Microsoft could not really support Public Folders in Office 365. To be honest, I am almost certain that Microsoft made the changes to the Public Folder architecture so that they would be able to offer them in Office 365. The fact that on-premises customers can now take advantage of those advancements is an added bonus.

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