Exchange Center

ENow Software's Exchange blog built by Microsoft MVPs for IT/Sys Admins.

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Theresa Miller

Theresa is a Sr. Technical Systems Administrator and has been working as a technical expert in IT for over 18 years. Theresa has her MCSE, CCA and EPIC ECSM certifications. Her areas of expertise are in the areas of Exchange, Active Directory, Lync, SharePoint and Citrix XenApp. She has architected, designed, implemented and led complex projects in all of these areas. She also is a public speaker, speaking at events such as Briforum 2013 and upcoming will be at E2E Virtulization conference in May 2014. She can be found on Twitter @24x7ITConnect and her personal blog is 24x7ITConnection.wordpress.com.

Outlook Mail

Outlook Calendaring: Best Practices and Key Considerations

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Theresa Miller

For as long as Microsoft Exchange has existed, Outlook meeting corruption has been a consideration for those who rely on calendaring. Meeting corruption can appear in many forms. However, meeting corruption typically occurs when meetings disappear, when duplicate meetings appear or through other unusual anomalies that users may experience with an appointment. Microsoft continually makes strides toward eliminating calendaring issues through Outlook and Exchange updates, however, calendaring issues still persist. More importantly, it’s typically our organizational executives who see the most issues when their calendars are not functioning as expected.

So what can we do about this?

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Exchange 2013 configurations

Exchange 2010 3rd Party SSL Certificates: The Whole Story

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Theresa Miller

Eventually all good things come to an end and that’s no exception to our 3rd party certificates that allow access to Outlook Web App and other web-based Exchange workloads such as Active Sync or Outlook. This article provides a step by step process on how to update your Exchange 2010 certificates from start to finish.  This article also assumes we are using a DigiCert wildcard certificate.  Most of this work can be pre-staged before the actual implementation and is highlighted below.  With that, let’s begin!

Generate a CSR

Generating a CSR and making sure it has been well documented on multiple websites is the first step to obtaining an updated wildcard certificate for your Exchange 2010 environment.  To ensure that your certificate has a private key refer to the “Using Shell to create a new Exchange Certificate” section in the TechNet article for generating your CSR appropriately.

Whether or not the private key should be exported depends on the application or the organization, and is a requirement for Exchange.  The private key certificate is used so the 3rd party certificate can also be used across multiple Exchange servers.  The certificate can also be used on the system or device that can authenticate external connections to ActiveSync, Outlook Web App or Outlook Anywhere.  An example of this would be Threat Management Gateway (TMG), User Access Gateway (UAG) or a network based appliance.  Be sure to investigate these requirements before the certificate updates on the Exchange server.  This will need to be done in conjunction with the work below.

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Microsoft Exchange Server readiness

Are you Ready? Recover an Exchange 2010 Server in Your DAG

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Theresa Miller

If you have ever been in a situation where you have lost a physical Exchange 2010 server from your DAG then this document is critical to your ability to recover this server.  Examples of how this could occur are through OS corruption, accidental overwrite or a true datacenter disaster.  Even if you haven’t been in this situation this article will provide the insight to what it takes to recover an Exchange server that had once been a beloved member of your Exchange 2010 DAG. 

Just to set the stage, there are very specific steps to the recovery process beginning with a fresh server build.  Before we can start building that new server there are some necessary steps to take and these are addressed next.  Also, this document assumes that you are running Windows 2008 R2 and that you are recovering all Exchange server roles.

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TechEd Information

The Exchange Track at TechEd 2014

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Theresa Miller

Are you attending TechEd North America in Houston, TX from May 12th – the 15th?  If so then choosing your sessions will be quite the challenge.  The conference in its entirety has almost 700 sessions to choose from.  If you are an IT professional attending in the “Office Servers and Services” track then your choices are narrowed down to 150 sessions covering Office 365, Office client apps, Microsoft Exchange, Microsoft SharePoint, Microsoft Project, Microsoft Visio, Yammer, and Microsoft Lync.  Of those sessions there are 58 to choose from covering Office 365 and Microsoft Exchange and only 4 days of conference to learn it all!

So, which sessions are most important to learning more about Office 365 and Exchange 2013?  Well I must admit that all the sessions do look wonderful, but this guide to the Exchange track at TechEd highlights the standouts.  It also leaves plenty of opportunities to pursue some of the other tracks that TechEd offers.

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On-Prem Exchange Notes

On-Premise Exchange Notes from MEC 2014

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Theresa Miller

MEC 2014 was an educational event that provided great insights into all aspects of Exchange.  If you missed the conference this article will cover learning aspects as they related to deploying Exchange On-Premise.  Here are some of my takeaways from the conference on this topic.

New Products
Microsoft announced that they expect the next version of Exchange will be released sometime in 2015.  As Office 365 continues to grow they are releasing new product options such as Clutter and People View to Office 365 customers first.  They also indicated that they do expect these options will be added to Exchange On-premises; however, the timeframe was currently unknown.

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Exchange 2010 Attributes

How to Add an Exchange 2010 Custom Attribute using PowerShell

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Theresa Miller

Every mailbox object in Exchange has a series of fields called custom attributes.  These can be found by right-clicking on a mailbox in the Exchange Management Console, choosing properties and then clicking on the custom attributes button in the bottom right-hand corner of the window.

So you ask, what might I use custom attributes for?  Within Exchange Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) there are some user-based policies which can use a unique custom attribute.  Additionally, if you are going to setup custom Address Lists you may also want to base your list on a unique custom attribute.

Set Custom Attribute for multiple users: So in order to set this up, you will want to put together a similar PowerShell script; however, customize the file path to your environment and then save this as a .ps1 file. This should be run via the Exchange Management Shell.

$data = get-content “c:\pathtotextfile\distros2.txt”
foreach($a in $data)
{
Set-Mailbox -Identity $a -CustomAttribute1 attribvalue
}
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Exchange Data Recovery

Exchange 2010 Public Folder Data Recovery

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Theresa Miller

As an Exchange administrator you likely work in an environment that has public folders.  Public folders allow users centralized access to tasks, email, calendars, contacts and more.  Over the years Microsoft has worked to move away from this technology, but was not able to due to customer dependence on this functionality.  In Exchange 2013, they have redesigned public folder technology and have introduced Modern public folders.  These are built on traditional mailbox technology which should streamline the backup and recovery process.  Despite this many organizations are still running Exchange 2010, so there is still a need to understand how to recover data from the public folder databases within your organization.

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Exchange 2010 Public Folders

Exchange 2010 Public Folders Manage Send As Issue

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Theresa Miller

 

Exchange 2010 Public Folders allow your administrators the ability to grant specific users the ability to send mail on behalf of a mail-enabled public folder.

Before we look at the Manage Send As issue, let’s take a look at how an Exchange or Security administrator would adjust the mail-enabled Public Folder Send As Permissions.

How to Manage the Public Folder Send As Permissions

  1. Open the Exchange Management Console
  2. Click the + to the left of Microsoft Exchange On-Premises
  3. Click the Tool Box
  4. Double-click Public folder Management Console
  5. Select the public folder that you would like to adjust the Send As Permissions on
  6. On the right-hand side of the screen choose Manage Send As Permission
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application screenshot

Automating Exchange Mailbox Audit Logging with Exchange 2010

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Theresa Miller

Understanding the details of user mailbox access is very important to knowing what is going on within an Exchange environment.  Being able to proactively audit mailbox access has become critical to the technology world we live in today due to the constant threat of security vulnerabilities.  Environmental threats can come from inside or outside of our organizations.

So, what kind of information can you obtain if you are auditing user mailboxes?

When auditing is enabled, Exchange Administrators will know when a mailbox owner, delegate or administrator mailbox login has occurred, and what actions were taken while the user was logged in.  This includes:

  • Whether a mailbox folder was accessed

  • If a message was permanently deleted or just sent to the deleted items folder

  • If an email was sent based upon the Send As permission

  • If an email was sent using Send On Behalf permission

  • Whether an email was moved to another folder

  • If the message properties were updated

  • And more

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Exchange 2010

Issue With Assigning Exchange 2010 Role-Assignment Policies

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Theresa Miller

Have you ever needed to change your Default Role Assignment Policy in Exchange 2010 through Exchange Management Shell?  An example of when you might want to do this is to prevent users from creating organizationally visible distribution lists through Outlook Web App.  Recently I realized that there may be a problem with the Set-RoleAssignmentPolicy command that can be used to set your users default role assignment policy.  Here is what was experienced.

Set Exchange users to the Default Role Assignment Policy

As you can see by double-clicking on the image below the following powershell command was run and indicated that all users were set with the Default Role Assignment Policy.  

Set-RoleAssignmentPolicy "Default Role Assignment Policy" –IsDefault

Problem

My next step was to remove my unused role assignment policy through Exchange Management Shell. 

Remove-RoleAssignmentPolicy “Policy Name Here”

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