Exchange Center

ENow Software's Exchange blog built by Microsoft MVPs for IT/Sys Admins.

Neon Lightning Bolt Success

How to Build a SCCM OSD Progress Report to Wow Your Boss: Part 2

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ENow Software

Now that you've looked over part 1's information on how to build a SCCM report of let's proceed with part 2.

Once you’ve properly extended the SCCM hardware inventory you should now focus your attention on the clients. In order for the clients to pick up their new marching orders they will need to retrieve a new machine policy. You can either wait for this to happen naturally or force refresh a few immediately. I recommend refreshing a couple just to make sure the 2 new inventory classes you’ve created were configured correctly.

Once you refresh the machine policy on a few clients go ahead and request a hardware inventory cycle as well. If you know off hand a couple of clients you know were imaged via SCCM/MDT, use those as the initial tests as well as a couple you know were done via other methods. This way you can confirm if the imaged clients are reporting and the non-imaged clients are not.

Check your logs

After the policy refresh and hardware inventory cycle, check the clients’ inventoryagent.log file. In this file you should see a couple references like these:

Collection: Namespace = \\.\root\cimv2; Query = SELECT __CLASS, __PATH, __RELPATH, KeyName, CM_DSLID FROM OSD_History_2; Timeout = 600 secs.
Collection: Namespace = \\.\root\cimv2; Query = SELECT __CLASS, __PATH, __RELPATH, InstanceKey, DeploymentMethod, DeploymentTimeStamp, DeploymentType, TaskSequenceID, TaskSequenceName, TaskSequenceVersion FROM Microsoft_BDD_Info; Timeout = 600 secs.

If you do, that’s good! That means the client knows about your new inventory classes! The next log you need to look at is dataldr.log. This log file is located in C:\Program Files\Microsoft Configuration Manager\Logs or related directory on your site server.

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Neon Lightning Bolt Success

How to Build a SCCM OSD Progress Report to Wow Your Boss - Part 1

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ENow Software

Microsoft SCCM (and MDT) are great tools that provide a robust system to lay down OS images onto many clients. Once setup, SCCM admins and technicians can easily image computers all day every day without thinking about how much time and money they’re saving the company. Rather than just telling your boss you’re making progress on something like the Windows XP replacement project you’ve got going on why not give her/him real, hard numbers of how many devices you’ve been knocking out over the past 6 months?

To do this we’re going to need to build a SCCM report. We need a report that will show us, historically, how many PCs we’ve imaged over a set amount of time. I’m also going to go out on a limb and say we want this report to update automatically and to not require any kind of intervention. Do I have your interest? I hope so!

Before we get started building this boss-loving and beautiful report we should first outline how it  will work. Retrieving historical data from the database server in a report requires a few different steps which I’ll be discussing in this article series. In part 1 of the series I’ll show you where the information is stored on the client that you’ll need to gather to determine if the client was imaged with SCCM or MDT. Once I know what I’m looking for I’ll then go over how to get this information into the SCCM database through creating a custom hardware inventory class.

In part 2 of the series, I’ll go over how to verify that the hardware inventory class was setup correctly by going over the pertinent logs and show you what query I created inside the SCCM console to quickly ensure the clients are sending the right information to the database.

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Exchange Server trends

Exchange 2013 Server Role Requirement Calculator – Part 2

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ENow Software

We understood the various input options available in the Role requirement Calculator in part I. Exchange calculator uses the entire data from the input worksheet and performs the calculation based on the input data and updates details on the worksheet defined below. These worksheets are for review purpose only.  Any change in the design has to be done in the input worksheet.

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Exchange Coexistence

Exchange 2013 OWA Coexistence with Exchange 2010

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ENow Software

Outlook Web App (OWA) has been a mandatory requirement for every organization. When Exchange 2013 is introduced in an existing environment, it needs to be configured for OWA co-existence with legacy Exchange servers like Exchange 2010 or Exchange 2007. OWA co-existence configuration will provide a single namespace for users accessing OWA, regardless of where their mailbox is located. This document is for the administrator to configure OWA co-existence using single name space for both Exchange 2013 and legacy Exchange servers (Exchange 2010 and Exchange 2007)

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Exchange Server Trends

Exchange 2013 Server Role Requirement Calculator – Part 1

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ENow Software

The Exchange 2013 Server Role Requirement Calculator is a one stop calculation tool for Exchange 2013 design. The tool covers design calculations for both the Mailbox and Client Access server role. Exchange 2013 reduced the number of roles from previous versions of Exchange by making the design and implementation as simple as possible. The Server Role Requirement Calculator helps us to size both physically and virtually and it provides in-depth sizing of every component of the hardware like CPU, Memory, Network, Storage, Backup, servers, datacenter etc.

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Exchange Monitoring: Built in Tools for CAS Monitoring in Exchange

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Jonathan Summers

Built-in tools for CAS Monitoring in Exchange 2016/2019

With some small and medium size businesses unable to afford larger, enterprise solutions for Exchange monitoring, we will explore the local tools built into Exchange to help you leverage Exchange CAS monitoring from within the Exchange program itself. This article is meant as an overview detailing the built-in tools available and may require more independent reading and learning before making any changes to your organization’s solution.

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