Exchange Center

ENow Software's Exchange blog built by Microsoft MVPs for IT/Sys Admins.

Autodiscover Protocol Vulnerabilities

Autodiscover Vulnerability FUD or Not?

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Jaap Wesselius

Social media exploded when an ISV who specializes in security released a blogpost about a vulnerability they found in Autodiscover, the protocol that is used by mailclients to discover Exchange configuration and configure themselves. Outlook is the client that uses Autodiscover the most, but mobile clients and third party applications can use Autodiscover as well.

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Lightning Bolt Success

How to Build a SCCM OSD Progress Report to Wow Your Boss - Part 3

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ENow Software

If you haven’t read part 1 and part 2 of this article series yet, we recommend you do. Reading parts 1 and 2 are essential for proceeding part 3.

Moving past parts 1 and 2, I now have all my clients using my new inventory classes I created. I’ve verified with a few clients that they are successfully sending this data to the site server. What’s next? The next piece of this process is to query the database, however this is an optional step. What we'll discuss next is setting up the SSRS report, but I always like to setup a SQL query in the SCCM console first. It’s a quick and easy way to figure out what’s in your database.

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Exchange mail diagram

Sending Receiving Messages from Multiple Locations in Exchange 2013

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ENow Software

Most organizations are spread across multiple locations in today’s business world. Exchange being such a critical application, it’s essential to make sure that it is up and running around the clock without any downtime. Regarding High Availability and Disaster Recovery, Exchange 2013 has many features due to new improvements and some changes with DAGs as compared to Exchange 2010. How would you provide a redundant path to send and receive emails from the Internet if an entire primary site goes down and exchange is running from the DR site?  Of course we can add additional servers in the DMZ to take up the load if one or more server goes down. What though could you do if the complete Datacenter goes down?

Let’s consider an example where we have two datacenters where Exchange servers are hosted.  The primary datacenter is in New York and has internet access to send and receive external emails through the internet and the other datacenter in Dallas. Both are interconnected by a high speed WAN network.

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